The Market and Negative US Rates: Right Idea, Wrong Tool
Decisions, Fast and Slow

Decisions, Fast and Slow

by Ken Haman
Many human decisions are driven by impulses known as heuristics, such as the simple-and-familiar bias. When mental energy is depleted, as during a crisis, advisors may employ this bias to select investment solutions that are easy to explain (simple) and that they’ve used before (familiar).

Advisor Institute


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What We Can Learn from China’s Rapid Normalization
Asian Stocks: Value Appeal Revealed in Coronavirus Recovery
Of Hawks and Doves—and Why Neither Is Right

Of Hawks and Doves—and Why Neither Is Right

by Ken Haman
As an advisor, you have protective instincts, so COVID-19 is likely to activate your emotions and push your thinking toward extremes. Your brain is probably searching the world for dangers and building a decidedly negative worldview. Psychologists call this catastrophizing: seeing the future in a negative light. This reduces your ability to sort available information.

Advisor Institute


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Systematic Target-Date Rebalancing: Taking Emotion out of the Equation
Do Healthcare Stocks Protect Portfolios in a Pandemic?
The Coronavirus Policy Wave: When Will the Bill Come Due?
How to Invest in Equities When Guidance Disappears
Corporate Debt: Defaults, Downgrades and Fallen Angels
Italian Sovereign Debt: How to Avoid Being Junked
Managing Risk Models in the Coronavirus Crisis
Coronavirus Challenges the European Project
DC Plan Sponsor Fiduciary Torch Is Brighter—and Can Help Light Dark Days
The One Question That Will Help You the Most Today
What Plunging Oil Prices Mean for Energy Bonds
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