Matthew D. Palazzolo, CFA

Matthew D. Palazzolo, CFA

Senior Investment Strategist, National Managing Director

9 Years at AB
20 Years of experience

Matthew D. Palazzolo is a Senior Investment Strategist based in Bernstein’s New York office. He was named a National Managing Director in 2017. In addition to his role as Senior Investment Strategist, he is also responsible for Bernstein’s market and investment-related communication and is a member of Bernstein’s Private Client Investment Policy Group, which provides asset allocation, investment and risk-management advice for high-net-worth clients, endowments and foundations. Prior to joining the firm in 2010, Matt was with Inverness Counsel, where he served as director of research, portfolio manager and a member of the investment committee. His responsibilities included overseeing equity research and assisting in managing portfolios on behalf of the firm’s high-net-worth clients and institutional investors. Previously, he was part of a team that conducted equity research at Prudential Equity Group, where he focused on the household and personal care sector across all market capitalizations. As part of the team, he interacted with corporate management of companies; helped develop recommendations on those companies’ stocks; and communicated those recommendations to the firm’s institutional long-only and hedge fund clients. Matt earned a BA in English and sociology/anthropology from Colgate University and an MBA in corporate finance from the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst charterholder. Matt is a member of the CFA Institute and the CFA Society New York.

COVID as a Catalyst: Are the Political Tides Turning?
COVID as a Catalyst: Will Efficiency Fall by the Wayside in a Riskier World?

COVID as a Catalyst: Will Efficiency Fall by the Wayside in a Riskier World?

by Matthew D. Palazzolo, Christopher Brigham
For decades, efficiency has been the name of the game for corporate management. Now that the coronavirus has exposed the benefits of robustness, supply chains and capital allocation policies may change. Companies may also take another look at automation, using the recession and pandemic as a catalyst to substitute capital for labor, leading to consequences for their finances, their employees, and the economy overall.

Coronavirus, Economics, Equities


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COVID As A Catalyst: A Tailwind for Technological Adoption

COVID As A Catalyst: A Tailwind for Technological Adoption

by Matthew D. Palazzolo, Christopher Brigham
The coronavirus pandemic condensed years of technological adoption into a matter of months. Companies and industries who can take advantage of the shifts to remote working, telehealth, and online education will benefit. Those who cannot were already vulnerable and are now even more at risk. We analyze these trends and the likely winners and losers.

Coronavirus, Economics, Equities


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COVID as a Catalyst: The Long-Run Economic and Societal Impact of COVID-19
COVID as a Catalyst: The End of the Era of Good Macro?

COVID as a Catalyst: The End of the Era of Good Macro?

by Matthew D. Palazzolo, Christopher Brigham
We’ve all benefitted from the past few decades of “good macro”—low inflation, falling interest rates, and stable growth. Given the unprecedented economic shock to the system from the coronavirus pandemic and the staggering increase in the national debt and money supply in response, are we at increased risk of a “bad macro” environment in the future?

Coronavirus, Economics


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Why Is The Stock Market Rising While The Economy Is Falling?
Why are interest rates so low? And where might they go?
2020 Brings Less Uncertainty, But Not Certainty
Are We Closer to a Recession Post-August?
Our Most Interesting Chart Right Now: Bull Run Not (Yet) Strongest or Longest

Our Most Interesting Chart Right Now: Bull Run Not (Yet) Strongest or Longest

by Matthew D. Palazzolo
The US stock market continues to hit new highs this month, buoyed by optimism that the Fed will resume monetary policy accommodation—by lowering interest rates—which should further support the economy and corporate profitability. Despite this, investors are still fixated on the duration of the current bull market—now over 10 years. The implication of these concerns is that the rally’s duration is reason enough to become more cautious. We disagree.

Wealth Planning


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The X’s and O’s of Tariff Management

The X’s and O’s of Tariff Management

by Matthew D. Palazzolo
Despite seemingly constructive talks between the US and China over the weekend at the G20 Summit in Osaka, the threat of further trade escalation looms. The initial rounds of US tariffs on Chinese goods were focused mostly on industrial products. But, if the US proceeds with tariffs on “List 4”–the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods not yet tariffed–consumers are likely to feel the effects. The reason? This next and final round places a 25% tariff on predominantly consumer goods like toys, apparel, sporting goods, and sneakers, among others.

Capital Markets Outlook, Trade Wars


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Most Interesting Chart Right Now: Recession? Not So Fast
Top Five Questions on Your Mind

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